ATLAS Guide
Please note that the content of this website is a point in time summary and is not intended to be prescriptive or final. Users are advised to check with the relevant bodies for the very latest status of all policy and guidance.

P4.9: Role of Planning Performance Agreements

Planning Performance Agreements (PPAs) are a project management tool with a remit to provide a structure for pre application discussions and greater certainty to planning application assessment and decision making process. The key components of the project management structure can fit the potential Planning Performance Agreement (PPA) process and hence this can be a mechanism to give some formality to an agreement between the Local Authority and the developers/ applicant. The main focus of a PPA is on achieving a collaborative, transparent planning process between partners and a product of this is to document an agreement for key elements of the project critically setting a clear project management process upfront including: Project Team and communication (Decision making process), Project Vision and Objectives, Project plan (tasks and issues, which is continually updated) and a linked programme with critical review milestones.

The scope and content of any PPA is likely to differ to reflect local circumstances. However, the approach establishes stronger project management, commitment of time, resources and political will from public and private sector for complex developments and gives greater certainty and confidence to the planning process, whilst improving the quality of development proposals and decisions.

Current guidance on PPAs and background information on planning delivery agreements (from which PPAs evolved) can be accessed in the links below. Further information on how to use PPAs is also included in a separate Topic Paper on this website (see link to the right or click here).

Last Updated on Thursday 29/03/2012 - 11:26AM

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Advisory Team for Large Applications (ATLAS), 2014